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LSHTM Health Economics Seminars - 30th January 2019

LSHTM Health Economics Seminars - 30th January 2019

by Graeme Hathaway -
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The NAITRE study - Impact of conditional cash transfer on poor pregnancy outcomes in underprivileged women: a nationwide pragmatic cluster-randomized superiority clinical trial in France. 

Professor Marc Bardou (Vice-President Board of Directors, Clinical Investigation Centre INSERM, and Gastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Dijon)

Abstract

While it is widely acknowledged that prenatal care is recommended during pregnancy to improve neonatal and maternal outcomes, coverage of prenatal care among low-income women in France is low. Building on the economic literature that found that conditional cash transfers are effective to increase uptake of services among the poor, we have designed a pragmatic cluster-randomized clinical trial to assess the impact of a financial incentive, conditional on attending scheduled pregnancy follow-up consultations, on maternal and neonatal health complications. This is known as the NAITRE (“born”) study. The study is currently ongoing and has already included 2,700 out of the 4,000 patients. The study has been highly controversial in France, a setting where financial incentives have not been previously used in the health sector. In this presentation, I will discuss the rationale for such study and the ethical concerns that were raised by national stakeholders. I will also present some preliminary results regarding the effectiveness of financial incentives for maternal and child health.  

Short Bio

Marc Bardou is a gastroenterologist and liver physician and medical pharmacologist. After medical studies and a PhD degree in Paris, he joined the University Hospital of Dijon. He is a graduate of Paris School of politics (Sciences Po Paris) and earns a MSc in Health Policy and Management. He is vice-president of the Board of Directors of the research department of the University Hospital of Dijon in charge of research affairs.

In 2007 he funded the Clinical Investigation Center (CIC) granted by INSERM (the French NIHR) and since 2012 he coordinates the national Gynecology and Obstetrics CIC network funded by INSERM. He has held and held numerous positions in both French and European drug regulatory agencies. He is a member of the expert committee for the prevention and promotion of health, at the French Agency for Public Health. For several years he has been developing interventional research in public health, mainly on the health of socio-economically disadvantaged groups in France.

Organiser:  Giulia Ferrari (giulia.ferrari@lshtm.ac.uk